a labour of love…

Red gloss makes me look away. It’s the first inherited colour that I paint over.  Red, raises stress, draws the gaze, takes over the place especially when on the focal point of a room like a fire place. Layers and layers of gloss over an old iron fire place makes my heart ache.  The iron cannot breathe through paint.  Here, I had so many other things to do that the red paint was far from the first thing in this room that was removed. I have been spending hours sanding, painting, oiling floors, nitromorsing and brushing iron, stripping wallpaper, painting ceilings, walls and stone. Slowly, the south bedroom of my small house, with an unbroken view of the sea has grown subtle, more natural, in keeping with the elements. Yesterday, as I was leaving,  I stepped back to look at my house with the disbelief that I actually live within it. I actually looked at the house and thought, ‘Man, I did it’.  It has taken me 6 months and one serendipitous moment to stand back and admire my home as an achievement.   Within the first few days of moving in, the house became a love of my life – not the – because I have Jess and Patti but this house sure is a love of mine.  I shared this view with a woman from the village who trod on my joy by saying, ‘you never would have guessed’ she said she was being sarcastic.  After that,  I began to hide my love, my joy and retreat to the sound of the old wooden latch, the view, the light, the tangible history within the house, which have all become a deep evolving love of living here.  

To get things done, I have been compartmentalising my life by working an admin job, teaching online knitting workshops, writing a business plan, designing knitting patterns, buying a car, writing online pieces and I have been working on my guest room in order to prepare it for guests.  Everything in the house has been shifted around to make space for this room to be restored, lovingly.   I find things to dress the mantle, to converse with the room, view and light.  Shetland sea urchins, I found in Brindister, the old wheelbarrow wheel from my barn, a bird’s nest from Martin’s lambing shed and one from Sumburgh farm, a bird’s wing from St Nininan’s beach – tiny shells and large shells all found within 3 miles of here build a story of local nature, Shetland life.

I yearn for an old iron and brass bed for the guest room – much like my own.  I have sourced one but it is in London and I cannot get it here. There are no deliveries off the mainland. I will wait to get the right bed.  I hear the Oceanic sank just off Foula in 1914 and there were 3 days things were removed from the liner and afterwards, when it sank, many things were washed up on the West Coast.  The Oceanic was the sister of the Titanic and it carried many ornate iron and brass beds now on the  sea bed.

I’ve restored many homes but this room has been a pretty big job – I have shed blood, sweat and tears – at one point, I knocked myself off a chair when the belt sander chewed up my trousers when I lowered my arms whilst trying to sand the ceiling (yes, really)  and that was really scary.  I did the  risk assessment, I knew the biting of the sander but it still happened. Finally, the sander has stopped. The screw and  plate had worked lose. I spent an hour trying to fix it but could not – so I finished the floor sanding by hand.  The guy at the paint shop is on first name terms with me because I’m a weekly customer.  The paint is the best I could buy. It’s inspired by a sample of wallpaper that I’m completely flattered that Emma has agreed to print.   When the paper goes on the walls, if Emma agrees, I will share its story – because event the wallpaper has a story.

I’ve just closed the bedroom door and realised that it is only 60% stripped.  I forgot about that.  But when it is finished, this room will be an unassuming, living, breathing room to gently connect to Shetland in more ways than one.

sanding again and again, oiling, fixing.

before

Author: traceydoxeydesigns

Site specific Artist using own created textiles, laser cuts and hand block printed wallpaper to engage with narratives of landscapes, social history and place.

11 thoughts on “a labour of love…”

  1. Wow Tracey, it looks amazing. So peaceful and inviting. What a lovely room for someone to stay in. I love reading about your journey – your dedication and commitment to your wonderful home and new life is so inspiring! All the best from Jane at NTU x

    Liked by 1 person

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